20 Most Instagramable Places in Western Australia’s South West


The south-west of Western Australia is a perfect road trip destination filled with world-class wineries, great beaches, forests giants and delicious foods.

Whether you’re a photographer trying to nail the perfect shot or just like sharing pretty places on social media, these spots in Western Australia’s south-west, will get the likes flooding in fast!

Don’t forget the south-west hashtags!
#australiassw #southwest #southwestlife #justanotherdayinwa #thisiswa #explorewa


1. Wyadup Rocks, near Yallingup

Also known as Nature’s Spa, this protected sea pool sits between Wyadup Bay and Injidup Bay, just south of Yallingup.
To get there, turn off Caves Rd and head to the end of Wyadup Rd, then walk down the pathway over the rocks towards the right which takes you to the natural spa. Don’t forget to also check out nearby Canal Rocks.
Tags: #wyaduprocks #naturesspa #naturalspa #wyadupbay #injidupbay #yallingup

Refreshing places to float. ūüć© Vol. I

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Getting My Freak On at Port Arthur

I’m someone that sits on the fence when it comes to the spirit world, I don’t disbelieve it, but until I see irrefutable proof, there will always be a little part of my brain that will say ‘weeeell, maybe’.
The rest of my brain, however, wholeheartedly believes and the little, disbelieving corner of grey goop lets it because it’s nice to think our departed loved ones are still around and that we can communicate with them.

It was that optimistic part of my brain that jumped at the chance to join a Paranormal Investigation Tour at the very haunted Port Arthur World Heritage site on Tasmania’s south-east coast.


Port Arthur has two distinct histories. An old one and a modern one, both terrible in their own ways. For those that are unaware, in 1996, a psychopath gunned down 35 people and wounded another 23. It was an event that shocked the nation to its core and spurred Australia’s strict gun control laws.
I had no interest in disturbing these souls. I paid my respects at the beautifully sombre memorial while walking around the site during the day but was glad to see the paranormal tour is conducted far away from the massacre area.

The nocturnal residents I wished to meet were from the convict era.

From 1833-1877 Port Arthur was a prison for Tasmania’s convicts who had become secondary offenders during their lengthy Transportation holiday.
While physical punishments were handed out, it was the psychological punishments that made Port Arthur unique. Most notably, those in need of extra punishment were hooded and made to stay silent in light-sealed, tiny cells, sometimes for months at a time. An act administrators thought would give the prisoner time to reflect. Instead, it often had the unintended outcome of inducing mental illness through lack of sight and sound. Continue reading

Mt Fuji’s Hidden Kimono Museum

It took awhile to find, which was more a reflection of my inability to read a map than its hidden location, but the rise of stone stairs to a carved wooden door would indicate that I’d finally found the¬†Itchiku Kubota Art¬†Museum.

Itchiku Kubota Art Museum

Entrance to the garden

Situated in the foothills near the north shore of Lake Kawaguchi overlooking Mt Fuji, is a place worth a visit even if just to see the garden alone. From outside its walls, amber hues drape over the carved entrance created from multiple doors said to have come from Indian castles. Stepping over the threshold feels invasive¬†like you’re intruding into some Japanese feudal lord’s private garden, but intrude I will!

While pretty all year-round, autumn is when the garden stands out with a profusion of foliage ranging from deep reds through to golden yellow. It’s spectacular!

Gravel paths meander through a small forest filled with purposely-placed rocks, ponds and waterfalls, all meticulously designed by the museum’s namesake, Itchiku Kubota.


Inside the garden

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